Google Stop development of Wave

I just read the article Wave Goodbye To Google Wave. It is such a shame that it had to go like that. It also ties to what the shiny wave wrote a while ago, that I did not get to respond to. The idea that nothing new was released at IO2010 or not enough could have something to do with it.

It seems like Wave stopped being hyped when everybody got on, and could not find a way to use wave. And when nobody responded to waves it seemed like everything just stopped. I guess the live typing was not enough to get people to be attracted to the application.

I guess that working on bold new ideas can have some draw back. For Google it could have made it a large upside with the investment in Wave. It could attract people to the Apps and thereby get more people to switch form Exchange to Gmail.

For me how has been trying to develop applications for Google Wave it has been going down for a long time. I guess that you do not need to be the first to create applications and plugins for a new platform. But it is something like the chicken and the egg, Wave could not be successful without a thriving ecosystem of software vendors.

I’m not sure what is going to happen to the blog. I guess it does not make a lot of sense to continue to write. I will admit that the blog has not been active for a long time. I also stopped being interested and have time to write about wave.

image by http://www.flickr.com/photos/ladybeames/2896787167

I/O 2010 – Join in Virtually!

Google I/O 2010 have accommodated a lot of application developers this year, however, there are still many who were unfortunate to join the event in person. That’s why, for those who weren’t so lucky to attend, you can now update yourself and join in virtually by watching the recorded videos of the different presentations shown at I/O.

All videos are also made available at this YouTube Playlist.

Munch on the videos now and see all the developments and new application releases launched at I/O 2010!


Are There Any Business Plans for Google Wave Developers

At Google IO, I talked with several of the companies presenting there. It was quite interesting to see what the different companies put into their Wave efforts. But, is there a business model around building wave applications. If there is on way to make money in the future on the app, it might not be interesting to start developing applications for wave.

There were the big players – SAP, Novell, Salesforce and Oracle. SAP and Novell both presented their “Wave” servers. Obviously, there is a model for providing servers/services to organizations with a higher level of group control or/and enterprise scalability. The services interact with Google and other Wave servers, but are being run on independent servers.

SAP is already providing Streamserve to their customers as an on demand solution that they can easily implement already. Novell Pulse is still not available and is waiting for more development, thought it looked like their service was pretty cool. I was standing beside Novell and saw what their application is capable of doing. ProcessOne was doing the same by creating a Wave server.

Salesforce and Oracle showed off how Wave could assist their customers interact differently with their platform. For them, Wave is just another platform they support to get more customers to user their services. I’m not sure if they charge extra for their services or it is just a free add on. If they can get some more customers based on the Wave platform then, it is a success. But they must be making the money on their other subscription service.

For Prezi’s presentation, they used Wave to just get another platform to show their presentations. With the help of the wave interaction Prezi will be able to get more exposure and other channels to deliver their cool presentations. This model is probably one that most of the companies at the stand used – to get more people to use their service, by offering Wave as a spate client for their services.

My goal is to build applications that we can charge for, or some premium model. We will be targeting the Apps Marketplace where we have an easy way to offer applications to organizations, and we have a pretty easy log in concept to make everything work. I’m really happy with the release of Wave for Google Apps and the Apps marketplace. It means that there will be a place where we can sell our services. In the first term it will be Caseish.com, but there will be other.

Then there was the student project processWave.org, a Gravity clone, which seemed to have taken a lot of improvements and was working pretty slick. But they did not seem like they were going to take any future actions in commercialize their projects.

We are also wandering to create a few games. Just to try out how it is possible to create games in Wave. We should provide some free games, and then the ideal would be programs with some more features. But without an appstore it will be more difficult to use and distribute the games. We have wandered to use Adsense on our games, but have no idea on it will be worth the while. So I guess we will have to wait for a free version or make a paid app using a robot to add the access control.

What is your view on how to monetize the way Google Wave applications are built?

5 Reasons Why Google Wave is Ready for Enterprise Use

I have been a fan of using Google Wave for communication. I have started to use wave in the sandbox, but at that time, it was not ready for enterprise use. Nothing has changed until the announcements at Google IO.

  1. Google can be run on your domain in the Google Apps environment. I wrote on my experiences with this earlier in “Announcing New Google Wave Application Developed by Masteringwave.” I think that this is a killer feature of the Google Apps which allows more users to switch to Gmail, because they get the functionality they want.
  2. With the help of wave for Google Apps it is possible to sell extensions to users of Google Wave for Apps. With the Google Apps Marketplace, it is possible to sell applications that can be used on the domain. I see this as a really nice way to start the promotion and selling of products, because it leverages the authentication of users that already exists in the enterprise. I’m expecting that this so fair is the best way to start selling products for Wave, and the way Caseish will be sold.
  3. The groups’ functionality is going to be extended more, making it possible to tailor the groups’ experiences even better. This is something that from the Wave Fireside chat at Google IO was something that was going to be released at some point.
  4. There are at least three servers that can federate with GoogleWave Sandbox at the moment (SAP, Novell, and ProcessOne). I only think that SAPs Streamworks is the only one already available.
  5. The stability and users experience have grown. Now it is much easier to get started using Google Wave. You don’t need to be a geek anymore to start using Wave for your projects.

Google I/O 2010 Updates: What I/O truly Stands For

Given the chance to be a participant in the event, I can say that Google I/O is really amazing wherein all developers are surprised with the new innovations when it comes to collaboration.

And, all of us are very surprised with the new API releases which were announced, namely:

“Wave This” Service

  • This allows website visitors to easily create waves out of the content on your site.

Run robots on any server

  • You run robots on your own web servers, which makes it also easier to write robots that integrate with your existing website systems.

Fetch waves with Wave data APIs

  • Allows developers to write programs that can read from and write to Wave on behalf of Wave users.

Use a robot to manipulate and retrieve attachments

  • Gives you the ability of reading and writing in wave which lets you cover more things than usual

Other companies also presented their current innovations like:

Novell Pulse

  • Working on ways on how to collaborate easily, instant, on-demand, and in real-time

SAP

  • Adopts Google Wave Federation Protocol with their StreamWork

Seeing all these announcements prove what Google I/O truly stands for…

According to Vic Gundotra, Engineering Vice-President of Google, I/O embodies the spirit of the Web, a spirit of collaboration, a spirit of inclusiveness rather than exclusiveness, and, a spirit of innovation and of openness.

I/O also stands for two most important elements of Web Culture: Innovation in the Open.

Keep posted for more updates!